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On the Other Hand: Ten Minutes of Torah

On the Other Hand: Ten Minutes of Torah, a podcast presented by ReformJudaism.org. Each week, Rabbi Rick Jacobs, President of the Union For Reform Judaism, will offer divrei Torah (insights into the weekly Torah portion) to help open up Jewish thought and its contemporary influence on your life. He condenses 2,000 years of Jewish wisdom into just 10 minutes of modern-day commentary. There are plenty of ways to interpret Torah and we want to hear what you think. You can weigh in on this week’s Torah portion by talking to us on Twitter @URJ or at Facebook.com/reformjudaism.
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Now displaying: August, 2018
Aug 27, 2018

Mental illness affects many members of the Jewish community, and there are small things that everyone can do to make those affected by mental illness feel more whole and welcome. Rabbi Jacobs discusses mental illness in and out of the Jewish community, the words we use, and how it all relates to Parashat Ki Tavo, in this episode of On the Other Hand

Aug 20, 2018

Parashat Ki Teitzei includes a set of teachings about conducting war. But how can these teachings be applied today, when the state of the world and the way war is conducted have changed so drastically? Rabbi Rick Jacobs explores this question in this episode of On the Other Hand.

Aug 13, 2018

This week, for Parashat Shof’tim, Rabbi Jacobs is joined by Dahlia Lithwick, who hosts the podcast Amicus and writes about the courts and the law for Slate. They discuss Judge Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the U.S. Supreme Court, what the justice system looks like today in the U.S. and Israel, and what the American justice system might look like in the future.

Aug 6, 2018

Parashat R’eih includes two important statements about poverty. The first, “there shall be no needy among you,” addresses the core Jewish value that we should live in a society where everybody has the means they need to live. The second phrase, “there will never cease to be needy ones in your land,” acknowledges that no matter what, poverty will never be completely eradicated. How do these two ideas serve each other? Rabbi Rick Jacobs gives his take in this episode of On the Other Hand.

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